Feminism

All posts tagged Feminism

The Small Woman in Grey

Published August 12, 2017 by biggayhorrorfan

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Quietly calculating, viciously over-the-top or timidly heroic, I love my women of horror. Therefore, the upcoming British production The Small Woman in Grey sounds truly appealing to me.

Written and directed by Andrew Eltham-Beyers, this soon to be released picture also utilized the talents of Sleepaway Camp’s Felissa Rose, behind the scenes, and legendary scream queen Brinke Stevens, in front of the camera.

Sounds like it can’t lose, right?

So, be sure to check out the official trailer:

Then sign up to get the latest scoops on the project, which prominently places two queer characters in the action, at https://www.facebook.com/Thesmallwomaningrey/, as well.

Brinke small woman

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Linnea Quigley: Tinker Hell and the Nonexistent Imp

Published June 9, 2017 by biggayhorrorfan

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Spider and Samantha are the names of the characters that forever charming horror goddess Linnea Quigley embodied in the cult classics Hollywood Chainsaw Hookers and Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-o-Rama. Spider, a hardened thief who takes on a murderous imp, and Samantha, who searches for her missing sister with determined grace, are also true evidence of the inherent feminist themes in B-Movies that have attracted fans, and even scholars like Carol J. Clover (Men, Women and Chainsaws), to these films for decades. On the eve of rare screenings of these fan favorites at Summer Scares in Chicago, Quigley, happily, shared some memories about the making of these mini-masterpieces of divine mayhem.

BGHF: Hey, Linnea! I’m so excited that they’re showing Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-o-Rama this weekend at Summer Scares. It’s one of my favorites.  Linnea: Me, too!

I think Spider, the character you portray, embodies so much of what is important about the female characters in those direct to VHS years. She’s strong and resourceful and gives off such a feminist vibe. Oh! Yeah. Because a guy wasn’t saving the day, she was. Thank you!linnea sorority

I think that’s why that Scream Queen Era was so important to so many people. Those films gave the actresses great opportunities. You were able to play doctors and scientists and cat burglars. I don’t think you got that in a lot of the mainstream films of that time. Oh, wow! You’re right.  We got to play murderesses and crazy people. The good ones!

Are there any memories that stand out to you about Sorority Babes? Weren’t the performers all housed together on location? Yeah. We were all at a La Quinta. We weren’t too far from the set. I had my own room because I insisted on it. I didn’t want to be in a room with someone who was wild or was staying up half the morning! (Laughs) I say morning because we shot at night. I like my own space.

It was a short shoot, correct? Actually, for a David DeCoteau film, it was a long shoot. It was seven days.

Seven days? That’s nothing! What was the usual time frame for shooting a movie like that? Oh, gee. Three days. A weekend!

Wow! Do you have any fun memories from working on Sorority Babes?  Yeah. There were a lot of weird things. My room was next to Andras Jones (A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: Dream Warriors). I thought he was cute. I had a little crush on him. But he was younger than me and he was in the prime of those hormone years. He was destroying his room and just being wild. I guess he was getting the last of that kid out of him and was being really silly and funny. He and the others would go out into town, which was a sea port, and everyone was just kind of all over the place.

Was there any else that was interesting? Of course, we had to act to nothing. The imp wasn’t there when we filmed and we didn’t know what it was going to look like.

David didn’t give you any clues? I don’t know about other people’s interactions with him, but he didn’t with me. He just let us go and do what we felt was right. If we had to be louder for the camera or if we were out of frame, he’d let us know that. He was really good about just letting us do our thing.

I understand that he let you choose the role that you wanted to play, as well. Yes! He gave the script to me and told me to choose the part that I wanted. It took me like two seconds. I want this part, I want this part!

Who wouldn’t want to be Spider? Of course! I didn’t want the other parts, I wanted that one. …and I had fun with it. I had so much fun. linnea hollywood

Did you have the same kind of fun on Hollywood Chainsaw Hookers? Well, that came about because Fred Olen Ray had a camera for four days over a holiday weekend. He and David DeCoteau would have bets over who could make a movie the fastest. It was funny. It was the first and last time that I worked for Fred. He just called me and wanted me to do the part. I was just excited to get roles. …and I liked the role. It was fun. (Laughs) I got to work with chainsaws.

Was there any kind of protection on set when you were doing your famous chainsaw dance? No! (Laughs) Of course not! Oh, the things won’t be on. It’s okay! Then I’m doing my dance and I felt something like hot oil on me. I didn’t want to stop the take. In my mind I was thinking that my legs were going to be scarred up. I don’t know what it was. It could have been oil. It was a little bit freaky. Fred kept saying, Dance sexy! Those chainsaws are so heavy! I was taking it seriously, too. I was really trying to dance sexy. It was so hard!

Your hardship was rewarded. The film’s a cult classic and I think many people discovered you through it and adore you. So, I guess the work is worth it, occasionally. Oh. Yes! Yes!

You also mentored Gunnar Hansen on that, as well, correct? Didn’t you encourage him to get into the convention scene? Yes! We were standing around waiting for the next shot. I told him that he should be doing the convention scene. He didn’t believe me. He thought The Texas Chainsaw Massacre had happened so long before and that no one would want to meet him or get his autograph. He thought no one would remember him. I said, are you kidding me? I was so excited to meet you. I was a little afraid. But you would be so amazing at conventions. He kind of nah, nah’ed it. Then when I saw him on the convention scene, I was like, okay! He got it. linnea gunnar

A little blonde angel you were, guiding him. Yes, take my hand, Gunnar, and I will lead you to the convention circuit! I was a Tinker Bell.

…Or maybe a bad ass version of Tinker Bell. Yeah, a bad ass Tinker Bell, that’s better.  Tinker Hell!

Yes!  I’m Tinker Hell!

I think that needs to be the subtitle for this interview! Oh, great! I’d love that!

Forget Scream Queen or Goddess of Horror or Femme Fatale. You want to be a Tinker Hell! Yes! We’ll coin a new thing!

We will! Definitely! summer scares

Be sure to join the Tinker Hell Squad by meeting Linnea at Summer Scares on Saturday, June 10th at The Patio Theater in Chicago. Linnea will be joined by fellow guests, Ari Lehman (“Jason”, Friday the 13th) and Mark Patton, (“Jesse”, A Nightmare on Elm Street 2). More information is available at https://www.facebook.com/events/813470602136871/.

Quigley, meanwhile, is always yielding dangerous accessories on the internet at www.linnea-quigley.com.

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Get Out: A Femme Appreciation

Published March 2, 2017 by biggayhorrorfan

 

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Catherine Keener (right) in Get Out

Maniacal and brimming with steely intent, Diane Salinger’s Mrs. Darrode in 2009’s Dark House, an entry in the short lived Fangoria Fright Fest series, is truly a compelling horror villainess. In fact, the well trained Salinger, who began her career with 1985’s Creature, commands with such intensity that Darrode would have been a worthy character to build a series around. Yet, disappointingly, the character, itself, is another in a long line of bad mother archetypes seen so frequently in genre films. Here, a foster mother who murders almost all of her charges in a fit of religious ecstasy, the unstoppable Darrode returns, as the film progresses, to get at the one girl who escaped her bloody crusade.

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Salinger in Dark House

 

Nicely, the damaging expedition that the primary female characters in director-writer Jordan Peele’s brilliant horror satire Get Out engage in has nothing to do with lousy parenting or with romantic obsession, another common femme terror archetype, but with a more sinister agenda. It ties in with the film’s brilliant look at race and culture in society and is also a refreshing change to the nasty lady ghosts and vicious spirits that have inhabited such films as Ouija, Lights Out and many others, as of late. Granted, a strong feminine antagonist is always appreciated, but here it is nice to have them in the flesh and blood, slowly stirring the plot and keeping you guessing as to their true intents.

get_out_2017_posterTherefore, Peele, who is justifiably being praised for bringing a strong sense of social commentary and compelling, layered minority characters to a genre that doesn’t necessarily always welcome them – except, so often, as Victim #1 – has also done right by his female characters, as well. It’s a profound achievement and, while these fictional women may not go down in the terror history books like Betsy Palmer’s magnificently protective Mrs. Voorhees (Friday the 13th) or Clare Higgins’ love possessed Julia (Hellraiser), they are the contemporary anti-heroines that we truly need in this period of time. Let’s hope there is more like them on the way.

Get Out is currently playing in movie theaters, nationwide.

https://www.facebook.com/GetOutMovie/   https://twitter.com/GetOutMovie

Until the next time – SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

www.facebook.com/biggayhorrorfan

Review: Housesitters

Published February 10, 2017 by biggayhorrorfan

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I’m a little jealous. In my stints as a house and dog sitter I found some weird things – homemade porn, leopard print sheets scented with perfume. I even got shown around one apartment by an owner who made no effort to hide his early morning boner. But, I never sat at a place with a creepy pentagram strewn basement and its own personal demon!

Best friends and eternal wisecrackers Angie (Annie Watkins) and Izzy (Jamie Jirak) hit the jackpot in director-writer Jason Coffman’s truly fun horror-comedy Housesitters, though.  Left a credit card and enough 80s/90s fashions in one closet for an effective musical montage, all they need is a couple of hot, trouble making  dudes to make their first house sitting adventure a total success. That’s where Greg (James Timothy Peters), a pizza delivery guy, and Zach (Peter Ash), Izzy’s boyfriend, come in.  Zach, in a nonverbal apology for eating all of Angie’s brownies, also brings along her current crush, Mark (Ben Schlotfelt).

But soon Greg and Mark are attacked by a miniature green creature and disappear. The appearance of Zach’s friend Dan (Jay J. Bidwell) singles more mayhem. Unable to leave the house due to their benefactor’s devilish dealings, the group venture to the basement to try to resolve their problems. The wounded Dan, though, emerges as something a bit more demonic and life between the bosom companions will never be the same again.

Smartly utilizing one location, haunted by Dustin Wayde Mills’ ravenously adorable monster-puppet, Coffman wisely builds the relationships between his main characters here. In fact, Watkins and Jirak are so natural and spontaneously goofy that they become the highlight of this tight yet carefree production. As the closing credits roll, it is obvious that they were allowed to riff on and improvise a large part of their material, making “Broad City Meets Monster Movie” a hoped for trend in the near future.

The duo’s male co-stars, Ash, Schlotfelt, Peters and Bidwell, also key into their low-key, naturalistic vibe. They all deliver believable and slightly ironic performances, surely a product of their seeming theatrical groundedness. Their skill, coupled with the surprising twists that Coffman provides for their characters in the film’s final moments, ultimately make Housesitters a truly entertaining celluloid outing. That it is also one filled with femme powered horror amusements is probably its greatest strength and joy. Let’s hope this really is a trend!

Note: This review was done on a work-in-progress version of the movie as it gears up for festival submissions. To be sure to join Angie and Izzy as they party their way to different events, follow https://www.facebook.com/HousesittersMovie/.

Until the next time – SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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On Ghostbusters

Published July 28, 2016 by biggayhorrorfan

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I should have been a Ghostbusters kid. I adored everything horror related from the time that I could remember and a comedy that featured green ectoplasm spewing spirits should have been right up my alley. But, I actually never even saw it until I was an adult. I should have been a Ghostbusters kid. But I wasn’t.

Lately, with the reboot so prominently fixated in film fans’ minds, I was wondering a bit about this and I think I’ve finally figured out why. It was too straight. Not that the ‘80s slashers films weren’t. But, at least with them, there was room for speculation among its chiseled final guys and athletic, half clothed male victims. But the comics (and comic actors) of that era – Eddie Murphy, Robin Williams, Chevy Chase, John Belushi, Richard Pryor, Gene Wilder, Steve Martin – all seemed so relentless heterosexual to me. In fact, as an awkward gay kid growing up in a small town, their humor didn’t seem designed for me at all. And, secretly, I wondered if it wasn’t even pointed at me, on occasion. Of course, Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis, the leads of the original Ghostbusters, pretty much fell in with that crowd. Thus, the film never even buzzed around the corner lines of my interest until much, much later.

So, while I still puzzle over the appeal of such films as Stripes – as much as I want to, I really don’t get them – I have come to enjoy Ghostbusters. Not as much as those who grew up marching to its puffy white rhythms, but I have become much more enthusiastic about it as I age. I also have come to realize, especially in the wake of the rampant dismay about the female driven remake, that while the film, itself, wasn’t necessarily too straight for me, maybe some (or a whole lot, as the case may be) of its fans are.

ghostbusters_2016_watermarked_batch02_05How else do you explain the avalanche of false, negative ratings placed on sites about the film by people who hadn’t even seen it? How else do you reconcile the hatred lobbed at Leslie Jones, its black actress, on Twitter? How do else do you calculate the dismay expressed by some when its suggested that they go see the film just to guarantee that other action films starring women will have a chance at getting  green lit? Isn’t that a more worthy reason to see a film than simply because Ryan Gosling (or Kate Winslet or Ryan Reynolds) is in it and you never miss one of his movies?

In fact, it’s an especially valid reason to see the film because, as a whole, this Paul Feig reboot is solid entertainment. Granted, there is something a bit commercial and cookie cutter about it, following the original’s plotline as closely as it does. But Jones and (particularly) her co-star Kate McKinnon, as the madcap (vaguely lesbian) inventor of the bunch, are able to break out of the molds prescribed to them and do some amazingly fun and inventive work.  

And anyone who doesn’t thrill to watching women save the day while still finding ways to support each other, despite their differences, has to be a little heartless…and unconcerned about the future of America. That may be a bold statement. But, to not acknowledge the victories this film can claim for young girls, who are so desperately in need of super heroines that fit an ordinary mold, is wrong…and totally, totally straight.

Until the next time – SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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