Soundtracks

All posts in the Soundtracks category

Music to Make Horror Movies By: Joyce Sims

Published March 22, 2020 by biggayhorrorfan

Joyce Sims Main

With its Phantom of the Opera style opening, Joyce Sims’ Come Into My Life burned up the dance floors in the late ‘80s and seemed the perfect song to be featured in a horror film. A few years later the producers of Species did include the popular track in a significant scene with Natasha Henstridge’s deadly Sil.

Sims caressed the keyboards with such dance legends as Mantronix, who produced a number of her most popular tunes, and is still creating new music and performing at nostalgia fests. More information on her activity is available at https://www.joycesimsonline.com/.

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Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Music to Make Horror Movies By: Joni James

Published March 15, 2020 by biggayhorrorfan

Joni Main 2

Possessing one of the clearest voices and sprightliest deliveries, singer Joni James has a special place in the sonic registries of many a confirmed music lover. When you meet a fan of hers, you are generally meeting someone who has a sophisticated, incredibly knowledgeable taste in those who record popular songs.

Proving her versatility, many a horror movie victim, particularly those in both versions of My Bloody Valentine, could certainly relate to one of her most popular songs, There Goes My Heart…and my left leg….and my arms…and my head….

Meanwhile, her site http://jonijames.com/ has information on how to join her fan club and other pertinent facts about her long standing, critically acclaimed career.

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Music to Make Horror Movies By: I Don’t Stand a Ghost of a Chance

Published March 8, 2020 by biggayhorrorfan

Alfred Hitchcock Music to be Murdered By

Just before my sophomore year of high school, I finally got my hair styled and my parents allowed me to get contact lenses. It felt like the whole world was opening up for me. Soon after that, I got the lead in the winter play, proof (I felt at the time) that change indeed was happening. As I was driven back and forth from rehearsals that late fall, Linda Ronstadt was continually, creamily crooning What’s New, the title track from her upcoming album of standards, on the car’s steadfast AM radio. I asked for the LP for Christmas that year.

MildredI lovingly remember playing that recording in my grandparents’ living room as the family sat around listening to it and chatting. In an often turbulent youth, filled with familial misunderstandings and the wisps of angst seemingly floating around the surface of many of my first tentative interactions, this is one of my favorite memories. Ronstadt’s version of I Don’t Stand a Ghost of a Chance was song that probably stood out the most for me then and now. Besides the supernatural element of the title, I always had the sneaking suspicion that romance would be elusive to me, that connecting with someone would perhaps be an awkward, unrealized proposition. It was also one of the tracks included on Jeff Alexander’s creepily arranged Alfred Hitchcock Presents album, Music to Be Murdered By.

While I adore Ronstadt’s moody treatment of the number, one of my favorite versions is a jazzier, breezier take by the incomparable Mildred Bailey. One of Bing Crosby’s favored colleagues, Bailey was a Native American jazz singer who made a stunning impression on the music industry. I wish she was more publicly acknowledged.

Of course,  I’ve heard ignoring your first could prove to have disastrous consequences, so…

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Music to Make Horror Movies By: Virginia Bruce

Published February 17, 2020 by biggayhorrorfan

VB Invisible Woman

If I had been an old Hollywood diva, I would have wanted the career of Virginia Bruce. An important figure in the world of Universal Horror due to her pert and powerful essaying of the leading role in The Invisible Woman, Bruce also worked with such notables as Jimmy Stewart, William Powell, James Cagney and Abbott and Costello.

Significantly, while trying to earnestly woo Stewart in Born to Dance, she also introduced the Cole Porter classic I’ve Got You Under My Skin.

Pretty much fading from the screen by the late ‘40s, this silver streaked celluloid wonder still left behind a legacy of dreamy magnificence, permanently drifting beneath the fantasies of old school movie lovers worldwide.

Virigina Bruce

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Va-Va-Villainess: Virginia Bruce

Published January 24, 2020 by biggayhorrorfan

Virginia Bruce Born to Dance cigarette

As Broadway diva Lucy James in 1936’s Born to Dance, smoldering pixie Virginia Bruce causes much havoc between enthusiastic hoofer Nora Paige (Eleanor Powell) and her shy, devoted sailor beau Ted Barker (Jimmy Stewart).

bruce-stewart-born-to-danceInitially using him as a publicity ploy, James soon grows serious about Barker. This, nicely, gives Bruce a chance to add layers of soft pain to her characterization. This humanity doesn’t stop this character’s out of control anger issues, though. After destroying a hotel suite and getting Paige fired from her understudy job, James is decidedly left on the outskirts of the film’s grand and happy finish. Virgina BTD2

Not surprisingly, the talented Bruce still comes out the winner, though. Born to Dance’s score was composed by none other than Cole Porter and, with sweet elegance, she introduced his classic I’ve Got You Under My Skin, which was nominated for an Academy Award, here.


Horror Hall of Fame:


Bruce filled the title role of 1940’s The Invisible Woman, a more comic take for the classic Universal horror series. This natural celluloid wonder also tangled with eternal mad scientist Lionel Atwill in the Abbott and Costello comedy Pardon My Sarong.

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Music to Make Horror Movies By: Tammy Wynette

Published January 19, 2020 by biggayhorrorfan

Tammy Wynette How often does this happen? One of the best known country songs of all time is featured in one of the more obscure horror projects of the ‘80s. Tammy Wynette’s iconic Stand By Your Man found its way into bizarre New Zealand blood fest Death Warmed Up, via a pretty cover version by the singularly titled Suzanne.

The legendary Wynette, who co-wrote this much recorded number with Billy Sherrill, always bucked the norm, though. Her final studio album featured duets with Sting and Elton John and she embraced the electronic age by performing Justified and Ancient with British music mavericks The KLF. The equally stellar Emmylou Harris also collaborated with her by offering up piercingly beautiful background vocals on the single Beneath A Painted Sky.

The health plagued Wynette, who passed away at 55 in 1998, is lovingly remembered at www.tammywynette.com. Known as the “First Lady of Country Music,” she was the winner of multiple Grammy Awards and has been, rightfully, inducted into The Country Music Hall of Fame.

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Death Warmed Up, meanwhile, just received a nice, multi-feature reissue from Severin Films. To witness how Tammy’s country charms mingle with the film’s punked out New Wave vibes visit http://www.severin-films.com. 

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan

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Music to Make Horror Movies By: Lorna Luft

Published December 22, 2019 by biggayhorrorfan

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Best known for her enthusiastic portrayal of Pink Lady Paulette in Grease 2 and for her famous lineage, Lorna Luft also joined the ranks of horror goddesses with her role in the Tales of the Darkside episode The Shrine.

The veteran of countless musical theater productions, Luft also knows her way around a torch song as evidenced by her take on The Music That Makes Me Dance:

Of course, New Wave enthusiasts are aware that she also backed up the likes of Debbie Harry, most notably on the popular Eat to the Beat track Slow Motion, and Hilly Michaels in the early ‘80s, making this performing dynamo a true delight in almost every entertainment medium imaginable.

https://www.facebook.com/LornaLuftOfficial/

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Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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