Music

All posts in the Music category

Music to Make Horror Movies by: Lauren Bacall

Published September 26, 2016 by biggayhorrorfan

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She had one of the most distinctive speaking voices of all time and the irreplaceable Lauren Bacall also used those smoky tones to subtle singing effect in such Broadway musicals as Applause and Woman of the Year.

Best known for her alluring performances in a series of noir classics with (her beloved, first husband) Humphrey Bogart, Bacall jumped on the early ‘80s slasher bandwagon by playing a theatrical diva whose life and limb (and sequin suits) were threatened by a smooth and menacing stalker (of the self loathing variety) in the underperforming (but twisted and enjoyable) The Fan. lauren-bacall-fan-2

Of course, here she is in complete control, singing I Wrote the Book (to a devoted Wayne Newton and others) from Woman of the Year, a role that won her a second Tony award.

 

…and if that doesn’t make you want to do a soft shoe, in the afterlife, with an old school diva…then nothing will.

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Until the next time – SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Music to Make Horror Movies By: Vivian Blaine

Published August 28, 2016 by biggayhorrorfan

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She added a little sophistication and dignity to cheesy, fun monster fests such as 1979’s The Dark and to 1982’s Parasite, but the glorious Vivian Blaine was best known for her take on the ditzy Adelaide in the original Broadway and movie versions of Guys and Dolls. Most importantly, perhaps, Blaine was also one of the first celebrity advocates for the AIDS crisis, providing a very visible presence in a time when most public figures shunned the realities of the disease.

Blaine, who also acted and sang in multiple movie musicals with the likes of the vivacious Carmen Miranda and smooth crooner Perry Como, reprised Adelaide’s Lament, her most famous number from Guys and Dolls, on the 1971 Tony Awards, twenty years after her debut in the role. There, she proved, beyond a doubt, that no one could portray the little quirks and eccentricities of the character quite like she could.

Until the next time – SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Music to Make Horror Movies By: Charles Boyer

Published August 21, 2016 by biggayhorrorfan

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Cinematic psychological breakdown, anyone?!?

Suave Charles Boyer embodied one of the screen’s most smoothly evil villains driving the frightened Ingrid Bergman into morbidly dependent despair in the classic thriller Gaslight.

Years later, Boyer used his continental charm for much less devious pursuits when he talk-sang his way through the 1966 album Where Does Love Go, which was rumored to be one of Elvis Presley’s all time favorite recordings. The French man’s take on All The Things You Are is decidedly sweet, but (as all good things) could provide a sinister edge if placed in a overly attentive context.

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Until the next time – SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Music to Make Horror Movies By: Tab Hunter

Published August 14, 2016 by biggayhorrorfan

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Tab Hunter’s latter day career answered that eternal cinematic question: Where do smooth dream boys go, once they age? Why into deliciously low budget horror films, naturally. In fact, Hunter, who hit it big in the ‘50s with such films as Battle Cry and Damn Yankees, might have just gotten his best roles as a psychotic, momma loving beach boy and as a secretly deformed, revenge fueled doctor in such projects as 1973’s Sweet Kill (AKA The Arousers) and 1988’s Grotesque.

Tab 2Hunter, who was discovered by legendary gay agent Henry Willson, also, as many teen idols before and after him, took to the recording studios and actually scored a number of hits. I Love You, Yes I Do wasn’t one of them, but it has a rockier edge than some of his more popular numbers, possibly earning it a  place of honor in every eclectic garage rocker’s heart.

Meanwhile, Hunter, who has revealed how his own homosexuality altered his career in an excellent memoir and highly celebrated documentary, is always carrying a tune at www.tabhunter.com.

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Until the next time – SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Music to Make Horror Movies By: Sal Mineo

Published July 4, 2016 by biggayhorrorfan

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Its 2016 and there are still inherent risks to being a member of the LGBT community. Thus, it is even more admirable to look back at the openness of Sal Mineo, an Academy nominated performer and former teen heartthrob, who brought a sense of sensitivity and despair to the psycho killer genre in 1965’s gritty, underappreciated thriller Who Killed Teddy Bear?

According to many reports, Mineo, who was murdered in 1976 during a robbery attempt, never hid his attraction for men and this may have hurt his latter day career choices. Of course, director Nicholas Ray famously capitalized on Mineo’s budding sexuality in Rebel Without A Cause. As Plato, his most famous role, Mineo’s attraction for James Dean’s Jim Stark was touchingly apparent. Proof of this is definitely contained in this loving video homage which highlights Mineo, who scored several hit singles as a teen, and his take on the song Young As We Are.

 

Of course, others may appreciate Mineo’s more garage-y sound on Little Pigeon, a number that is sure to put certain readers in mind of his theater career, which included a couple of takes on the prison drama Fortune and Men’s Eyes.

 

 

Meanwhile, Mineo’s most ardent fans keep the love flowing for him at www.salmineo.com, a beautiful website dedicated to this renaissance man and his career.

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Until the next time – SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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The Casket Girls on Tour!

Published June 14, 2016 by biggayhorrorfan

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I imagine there are few good things about being buried alive – privacy, perhaps. Quiet…if you really need it that badly. But breathing in the same space as the electrifyingly awesome The Casket Girls is always highly recommended. Crafting songs that are vibrant and exciting and full of gothic tinges of electro-pop, these two enchantresses have recently released an acclaimed new full length, The Night Machines.

This mysterious duo is also trekking across various worthy cities in the US, until June 22nd, with the 2016 Graveface Roadshow. It’s a brilliant line-up, including such epic artists as Dott and Stardeath and White Dwarves. More info is available at: https://www.facebook.com/events/456349711222576/.

Meanwhile, you can enjoy this haunting new track…

…and then rub yourself in black pixie dust and check out

http://www.graveface.com/  and https://www.facebook.com/casketgirls/, as well!

Until the next time, SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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Music to Make Horror Movies By: Harold Lloyd, Jr.

Published June 12, 2016 by biggayhorrorfan

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Me and my shadow / Strolling down the avenue / Me and my shadow / Not a soul to tell our troubles to” – Rose, Dreyer, Jolson

It was easy to escape the influence of my forebears – a couple potions and a naked rendezvous or two with devilish types and I was as good as new. Harold Lloyd, Jr. (1931 – 1971) had a bit more difficult time. As the son of Harold Lloyd, one of cinematic comedy’s early kings, Lloyd struggled to make his way in show business…and life.

Still, the troubled man landed roles in a couple cult classics. He sensitively (if slightly exaggeratedly) paints a portrait of a kind yet conflicted youth in The Flaming Urge (1953), the story of an obsessed fire chaser who is accused of a series of arsons in a small town. He is probably best remembered, though, for his energy filled take on the extremely horny Don in the fun teen drive-in horror Frankenstein’s Daughter (1958).

Lloyd Jr. also pursued a singing career, releasing one album. His smooth delivery and easy tones work well with this version of Go Back to Him. Meanwhile, astute Hollywood followers may note this selection with some sense of irony as Lloyd Jr.’s homosexuality was a fairly well known secret in a time when such matters were less socially acceptable.

Unfortunately, this brave yet sensitive soul died from complications from a stroke, perhaps caused by his alcoholism, at age 40, long before reaching his full potential. Here’s hoping that posterity will, eventually, be kinder to him than he was to himself.

Until the next time – SWEET love and pink GRUE, Big Gay Horror Fan!

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